“If I suffered from bad acne as a teenager, will my daughter have it when she becomes a teenager too?”

Evidence does suggest that genetics have a role in the development of acne. Individuals whose parent or parents had acne may find themselves at higher risk of developing the condition as well.

That said, it is important to keep in mind that genetics are certainly not the only factor that contributes to the development of acne. Hormones, excessive growth of the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and abnormal production of skin cells are all key factors that are part of the underlying cause of acne, in addition to the genetic link. Moreover, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that environmental and lifestyle factors also make a contribution to the development of acne.

Examples of these factors include diet, stress and physical inactivity.

Thus, while genetics, a factor that cannot be changed, may potentially increase the risk of developing acting, other risk factors that are modifiable and can be changed are involved. These factors present an opportunity for intervention. If your daughter does develop acne, I would recommend seeking the advice of a pharmacist who can assist with establishing an appropriate skin care routine to help manage the condition.